The Other Slavery

Filename: the-other-slavery.pdf
ISBN: 9780544602670
Release Date: 2016-04-12
Number of pages: 448
Author: Andrés Reséndez
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Download and read online The Other Slavery in PDF and EPUB A landmark history — the sweeping story of the enslavement of tens of thousands of Indians across America, from the time of the conquistadors up to the early 20th century Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in much of the American continent. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez illuminates in his myth-shattering The Other Slavery, it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. There was no abolitionist movement to protect the tens of thousands of natives who were kidnapped and enslaved by the conquistadors, then forced to descend into the “mouth of hell” of eighteenth-century silver mines or, later, made to serve as domestics for Mormon settlers and rich Anglos. Reséndez builds the incisive case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America. New evidence, including testimonies of courageous priests, rapacious merchants, Indian captives, and Anglo colonists, sheds light too on Indian enslavement of other Indians — as what started as a European business passed into the hands of indigenous operators and spread like wildfire across vast tracts of the American Southwest. The Other Slavery reveals nothing less than a key missing piece of American history. For over two centuries we have fought over, abolished, and tried to come to grips with African-American slavery. It is time for the West to confront an entirely separate, equally devastating enslavement we have long failed truly to see.


The Other Slavery

Filename: the-other-slavery.pdf
ISBN: 054494710X
Release Date: 2017-04-18
Number of pages: 456
Author: Andres Resendez
Publisher: Mariner Books

Download and read online The Other Slavery in PDF and EPUB "A necessary work that occupies a loaded historical landscape . . . An object lesson in the trickle-down horrors of colonialism." --NPR "Arguably one of the most profound contributions to North American history published since Patricia Nelson Limerick's Legacy of Conquest." --Los Angeles Times Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in much of the American continent. Yet, as Andrés Reséndez illuminates in his myth-shattering The Other Slavery, it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. There was no abolitionist movement to protect the tens of thousands of natives who were kidnapped and enslaved by the conquistadors. Reséndez builds the incisive case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America. Through riveting new evidence, including testimonies of courageous priests, rapacious merchants, and Indian captives, The Other Slavery reveals nothing less than a key missing piece of American history. For over two centuries we have fought over, abolished, and tried to come to grips with African-American slavery. It is time for the West to confront an entirely separate, equally devastating enslavement we have long failed truly to see.


The Other Slavery

Filename: the-other-slavery.pdf
ISBN: 0547640986
Release Date: 2016-04-12
Number of pages: 448
Author: Andres Resendez
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Download and read online The Other Slavery in PDF and EPUB A myth-shattering work that draws on new evidence to reveal the massive enslavement of tens of thousands of North American Indians, from its beginnings in the early 1500s to its last gasp in the late 1800s Since the time of Columbus, Indian slavery was illegal in much of the American continent. Yet, as historian Andrés Reséndez illuminates in The Other Slavery, it was practiced for centuries as an open secret. There was no abolitionist movement to protect the tens of thousands of natives who were kidnapped and enslaved by the conquistadors and later forced to serve as domestics for Mormons and rich Anglos, or to descend into the "mouth of hell" of eighteenth-century silver mines, where, if they didn't die quickly from cave-ins, they would die slowly from silica in their lungs. Reséndez builds the incisive, original case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America. New evidence, including testimonies of courageous priests, rapacious merchants, Indian captives, and Anglo colonists, sheds light on Indian enslavement of other Indians -- as what started as a European business passed into the hands of indigenous operators and spread like wildfire across vast tracts of the American Southwest. The Other Slavery is nothing less than a key missing piece of American history, one that changes an entire national narrative.


Black Slaves Indian Masters

Filename: black-slaves-indian-masters.pdf
ISBN: 9781469607108
Release Date: 2013
Number of pages: 211
Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online Black Slaves Indian Masters in PDF and EPUB Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South


Indian Slavery in Colonial America

Filename: indian-slavery-in-colonial-america.pdf
ISBN: 9780803222007
Release Date: 2009
Number of pages: 440
Author: Alan Gallay
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

Download and read online Indian Slavery in Colonial America in PDF and EPUB European enslavement of American Indians began with Christopher Columbus?s arrival in the New World. The slave trade expanded with European colonies, and though African slave labor filled many needs, huge numbers of America?s indigenous peoples continued to be captured and forced to work as slaves. Although central to the process of colony-building in what became the United States, this phenomena has received scant attention from historians. ø Indian Slavery in Colonial America, edited by Alan Gallay, examines the complicated dynamics of Indian enslavement. How and why Indians became both slaves of the Europeans and suppliers of slavery?s victims is the subject of this book. The essays in this collection use Indian slavery as a lens through which to explore both Indian and European societies and their interactions, as well as relations between and among Native groups.


New England Bound

Filename: new-england-bound.pdf
ISBN: 1631493248
Release Date: 2017-05-09
Number of pages: 368
Author: Wendy Warren
Publisher:

Download and read online New England Bound in PDF and EPUB "This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." David W. Blight "


An American Genocide

Filename: an-american-genocide.pdf
ISBN: 9780300182170
Release Date: 2016-05-24
Number of pages: 480
Author: Benjamin Madley
Publisher: Yale University Press

Download and read online An American Genocide in PDF and EPUB Between 1846 and 1873, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended. This deeply researched book is a comprehensive and chilling history of an American genocide. Madley describes pre-contact California and precursors to the genocide before explaining how the Gold Rush stirred vigilante violence against California Indians. He narrates the rise of a state-sanctioned killing machine and the broad societal, judicial, and political support for genocide. Many participated: vigilantes, volunteer state militiamen, U.S. Army soldiers, U.S. congressmen, California governors, and others. The state and federal governments spent at least $1,700,000 on campaigns against California Indians. Besides evaluating government officials’ culpability, Madley considers why the slaughter constituted genocide and how other possible genocides within and beyond the Americas might be investigated using the methods presented in this groundbreaking book.


Stamped from the Beginning

Filename: stamped-from-the-beginning.pdf
ISBN: 9781568584645
Release Date: 2016-04-12
Number of pages: 592
Author: Ibram X. Kendi
Publisher: Nation Books

Download and read online Stamped from the Beginning in PDF and EPUB WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD IN NONFICTION Americans like to insist that we are living in a postracial, color-blind society. In fact, racist thought is alive and well; it has simply become more sophisticated and more insidious. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, racist ideas in this country have a long and lingering history, one in which nearly every great American thinker is complicit. In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the lives of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W. E. B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. As Kendi provocatively illustrates, racist thinking did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Racist ideas were created and popularized in an effort to defend deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and to rationalize the nation's racial inequities in everything from wealth to health. While racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them-and in the process, gives us reason to hope.


American Slave Coast

Filename: american-slave-coast.pdf
ISBN: 9781613748237
Release Date: 2015-10-01
Number of pages: 752
Author: Ned Sublette
Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Download and read online American Slave Coast in PDF and EPUB A wide-ranging, powerful, alternative vision of the history of the United States and how the slave-breeding industry shaped it The American Slave Coast tells the horrific story of how the slavery business in the United States made the reproductive labor of "breeding women" essential to the expansion of the nation. The book shows how slaves' children, and their children's children, were human savings accounts that were the basis of money and credit. This was so deeply embedded in the economy of the slave states that it could only be decommissioned by Emancipation, achieved through the bloodiest war in the history of the United States. The American Slave Coast is an alternative history of the United States that presents the slavery business, as well as familiar historical figures and events, in a revealing new light.


Freedom s Mirror

Filename: freedom-s-mirror.pdf
ISBN: 9781107029422
Release Date: 2014-11-28
Number of pages: 384
Author: Ada Ferrer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online Freedom s Mirror in PDF and EPUB "The Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 was the only slave rebellion in which slaves and former slaves succeeded in ending slavery and establishing an independent state, making it perhaps the most radical revolution of the modern world. Yet on the Spanish island of Cuba, barely fifty miles away, the events in Haiti helped usher in the antithesis of revolutionary emancipation. There, planters and authorities saw the devastation of their neighboring colony and rushed to prevent the same events from happening in Cuba by buttressing the institutions of slavery and colonial rule. Freedom's Mirror follows the reverberations of the Haitian Revolution in Cuba, where the violent entrenchment of slavery occurred at the very moment that the Haitian Revolution provided a powerful and proximate example of slaves destroying slavery. By linking two stories--the story of the Haitian Revolution and that of the rise of Cuban slave society--that are usually told separately, Ada Ferrer sheds fresh light on both of these crucial moments in Caribbean and Atlantic history"--Provided by publisher.


All the Real Indians Died Off

Filename: all-the-real-indians-died-off.pdf
ISBN: 9780807062654
Release Date: 2016-10-04
Number of pages: 224
Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Publisher: Beacon Press

Download and read online All the Real Indians Died Off in PDF and EPUB Unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans "All the Real Indians Died Off" and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans critically deconstructs persistent myths about American Indians that have taken hold in the United States. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture ("Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcoholism") and history ("Columbus Discovered America") and trace how they developed. They deftly show how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of the settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land, and that they can be traced to narratives of erasure and disappearance.


The Saltwater Frontier

Filename: the-saltwater-frontier.pdf
ISBN: 9780300216691
Release Date: 2015-11-03
Number of pages: 360
Author: Andrew Lipman
Publisher: Yale University Press

Download and read online The Saltwater Frontier in PDF and EPUB Andrew Lipman’s eye-opening first book is the previously untold story of how the ocean became a “frontier” between colonists and Indians. When the English and Dutch empires both tried to claim the same patch of coast between the Hudson River and Cape Cod, the sea itself became the arena of contact and conflict. During the violent European invasions, the region’s Algonquian-speaking Natives were navigators, boatbuilders, fishermen, pirates, and merchants who became active players in the emergence of the Atlantic World. Drawing from a wide range of English, Dutch, and archeological sources, Lipman uncovers a new geography of Native America that incorporates seawater as well as soil. Looking past Europeans’ arbitrary land boundaries, he reveals unseen links between local episodes and global events on distant shores. Lipman’s book “successfully redirects the way we look at a familiar history” (Neal Salisbury, Smith College). Extensively researched and elegantly written, this latest addition to Yale’s seventeenth-century American history list brings the early years of New England and New York vividly to life.


Imbeciles

Filename: imbeciles.pdf
ISBN: 9781101980835
Release Date: 2016-03-01
Number of pages: 416
Author: Adam Cohen
Publisher: Penguin

Download and read online Imbeciles in PDF and EPUB Longlisted for the 2016 National Book Award for Nonfiction One of America’s great miscarriages of justice, the Supreme Court’s infamous 1927 Buck v. Bell ruling made government sterilization of “undesirable” citizens the law of the land In 1927, the Supreme Court handed down a ruling so disturbing, ignorant, and cruel that it stands as one of the great injustices in American history. In Imbeciles, bestselling author Adam Cohen exposes the court’s decision to allow the sterilization of a young woman it wrongly thought to be “feebleminded” and to champion the mass eugenic sterilization of undesirable citizens for the greater good of the country. The 8–1 ruling was signed by some of the most revered figures in American law—including Chief Justice William Howard Taft, a former U.S. president; and Louis Brandeis, a progressive icon. Oliver Wendell Holmes, considered by many the greatest Supreme Court justice in history, wrote the majority opinion, including the court’s famous declaration “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.” Imbeciles is the shocking story of Buck v. Bell, a legal case that challenges our faith in American justice. A gripping courtroom drama, it pits a helpless young woman against powerful scientists, lawyers, and judges who believed that eugenic measures were necessary to save the nation from being “swamped with incompetence.” At the center was Carrie Buck, who was born into a poor family in Charlottesville, Virginia, and taken in by a foster family, until she became pregnant out of wedlock. She was then declared “feebleminded” and shipped off to the Colony for Epileptics and Feeble-Minded. Buck v. Bell unfolded against the backdrop of a nation in the thrall of eugenics, which many Americans thought would uplift the human race. Congress embraced this fervor, enacting the first laws designed to prevent immigration by Italians, Jews, and other groups charged with being genetically inferior. Cohen shows how Buck arrived at the colony at just the wrong time, when influential scientists and politicians were looking for a “test case” to determine whether Virginia’s new eugenic sterilization law could withstand a legal challenge. A cabal of powerful men lined up against her, and no one stood up for her—not even her lawyer, who, it is now clear, was in collusion with the men who wanted her sterilized. In the end, Buck’s case was heard by the Supreme Court, the institution established by the founders to ensure that justice would prevail. The court could have seen through the false claim that Buck was a threat to the gene pool, or it could have found that forced sterilization was a violation of her rights. Instead, Holmes, a scion of several prominent Boston Brahmin families, who was raised to believe in the superiority of his own bloodlines, wrote a vicious, haunting decision upholding Buck’s sterilization and imploring the nation to sterilize many more. Holmes got his wish, and before the madness ended some sixty to seventy thousand Americans were sterilized. Cohen overturns cherished myths and demolishes lauded figures in relentless pursuit of the truth. With the intellectual force of a legal brief and the passion of a front-page exposé, Imbeciles is an ardent indictment of our champions of justice and our optimistic faith in progress, as well as a triumph of American legal and social history. From the Hardcover edition.


Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean 1570 1640

Filename: atlantic-africa-and-the-spanish-caribbean-1570-1640.pdf
ISBN: 9781469623801
Release Date: 2016-03-09
Number of pages: 352
Author: David Wheat
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean 1570 1640 in PDF and EPUB This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and then Angola, contributed forced migrant populations with distinct experiences to the Caribbean. They played a dynamic role in the social formation of early Spanish colonial society in the fortified port cities of Cartagena de Indias, Havana, Santo Domingo, and Panama City and their semirural hinterlands. David Wheat is the first scholar to establish this early phase of the "Africanization" of the Spanish Caribbean two centuries before the rise of large-scale sugar plantations. With African migrants and their descendants comprising demographic majorities in core areas of Spanish settlement, Luso-Africans, Afro-Iberians, Latinized Africans, and free people of color acted more as colonists or settlers than as plantation slaves. These ethnically mixed and economically diversified societies constituted a region of overlapping Iberian and African worlds, while they made possible Spain's colonization of the Caribbean.


Bind Us Apart

Filename: bind-us-apart.pdf
ISBN: 9780465065615
Release Date: 2016-04-26
Number of pages: 416
Author: Nicholas Guyatt
Publisher: Basic Books

Download and read online Bind Us Apart in PDF and EPUB Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident racists, but tortured reformers conscious of the damage that racism would do to the nation. Many tried to build a multiracial America in the early nineteenth century, but ultimately adopted the belief that non-whites should create their own republics elsewhere: in an Indian state in the West, or a colony for free blacks in Liberia. Herein lie the origins of “separate but equal.” Essential reading for anyone hoping to understand today's racial tensions, Bind Us Apart reveals why racial justice in the United States continues to be an elusive goal: despite our best efforts, we have never been able to imagine a fully inclusive, multiracial society.