The Native Ground

Filename: the-native-ground.pdf
ISBN: 9780812201826
Release Date: 2011-06-03
Number of pages: 336
Author: Kathleen DuVal
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

Download and read online The Native Ground in PDF and EPUB In The Native Ground, Kathleen DuVal argues that it was Indians rather than European would-be colonizers who were more often able to determine the form and content of the relations between the two groups. Along the banks of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, far from Paris, Madrid, and London, European colonialism met neither accommodation nor resistance but incorporation. Rather than being colonized, Indians drew European empires into local patterns of land and resource allocation, sustenance, goods exchange, gender relations, diplomacy, and warfare. Placing Indians at the center of the story, DuVal shows both their diversity and our contemporary tendency to exaggerate the influence of Europeans in places far from their centers of power. Europeans were often more dependent on Indians than Indians were on them. Now the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado, this native ground was originally populated by indigenous peoples, became part of the French and Spanish empires, and in 1803 was bought by the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. Drawing on archaeology and oral history, as well as documents in English, French, and Spanish, DuVal chronicles the successive migrations of Indians and Europeans to the area from precolonial times through the 1820s. These myriad native groups—Mississippians, Quapaws, Osages, Chickasaws, Caddos, and Cherokees—and the waves of Europeans all competed with one another for control of the region. Only in the nineteenth century did outsiders initiate a future in which one people would claim exclusive ownership of the mid-continent. After the War of 1812, these settlers came in numbers large enough to overwhelm the region's inhabitants and reject the early patterns of cross-cultural interdependence. As citizens of the United States, they persuaded the federal government to muster its resources on behalf of their dreams of landholding and citizenship. With keen insight and broad vision, Kathleen DuVal retells the story of Indian and European contact in a more complex and, ultimately, more satisfactory way.


The Native Ground

Filename: the-native-ground.pdf
ISBN: 0812219392
Release Date: 2011-01-01
Number of pages: 336
Author: Kathleen DuVal
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

Download and read online The Native Ground in PDF and EPUB In The Native Ground, Kathleen DuVal argues that it was Indians rather than European would-be colonizers who were more often able to determine the form and content of the relations between the two groups. Along the banks of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, far from Paris, Madrid, and London, European colonialism met neither accommodation nor resistance but incorporation. Rather than being colonized, Indians drew European empires into local patterns of land and resource allocation, sustenance, goods exchange, gender relations, diplomacy, and warfare. Placing Indians at the center of the story, DuVal shows both their diversity and our contemporary tendency to exaggerate the influence of Europeans in places far from their centers of power. Europeans were often more dependent on Indians than Indians were on them. Now the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado, this native ground was originally populated by indigenous peoples, became part of the French and Spanish empires, and in 1803 was bought by the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. Drawing on archaeology and oral history, as well as documents in English, French, and Spanish, DuVal chronicles the successive migrations of Indians and Europeans to the area from precolonial times through the 1820s. These myriad native groups—Mississippians, Quapaws, Osages, Chickasaws, Caddos, and Cherokees—and the waves of Europeans all competed with one another for control of the region. Only in the nineteenth century did outsiders initiate a future in which one people would claim exclusive ownership of the mid-continent. After the War of 1812, these settlers came in numbers large enough to overwhelm the region's inhabitants and reject the early patterns of cross-cultural interdependence. As citizens of the United States, they persuaded the federal government to muster its resources on behalf of their dreams of landholding and citizenship. With keen insight and broad vision, Kathleen DuVal retells the story of Indian and European contact in a more complex and, ultimately, more satisfactory way.


The Native Ground

Filename: the-native-ground.pdf
ISBN: 0812239180
Release Date: 2006
Number of pages: 320
Author: Kathleen DuVal
Publisher: Cornell University Press

Download and read online The Native Ground in PDF and EPUB In The Native Ground, Kathleen DuVal argues that it was Indians rather than European would-be colonizers who were more often able to determine the form and content of the relations between the two groups. Along the banks of the Arkansas and Mississippi rivers, far from Paris, Madrid, and London, European colonialism met neither accommodation nor resistance but incorporation. Rather than being colonized, Indians drew European empires into local patterns of land and resource allocation, sustenance, goods exchange, gender relations, diplomacy, and warfare. Placing Indians at the center of the story, DuVal shows both their diversity and our contemporary tendency to exaggerate the influence of Europeans in places far from their centers of power. Europeans were often more dependent on Indians than Indians were on them.Now the states of Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado, this native ground was originally populated by indigenous peoples, became part of the French and Spanish empires, and in 1803 was bought by the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. Drawing on archaeology and oral history, as well as documents in English, French, and Spanish, DuVal chronicles the successive migrations of Indians and Europeans to the area from precolonial times through the 1820s. These myriad native groups Mississippians, Quapaws, Osages, Chickasaws, Caddos, and Cherokees and the waves of Europeans all competed with one another for control of the region.Only in the nineteenth century did outsiders initiate a future in which one people would claim exclusive ownership of the mid-continent. After the War of 1812, these settlers came in numbers large enough to overwhelm the region's inhabitants and reject the early patterns of cross-cultural interdependence. As citizens of the United States, they persuaded the federal government to muster its resources on behalf of their dreams of landholding and citizenship.With keen insight and broad vision, Kathleen DuVal retells the story of Indian and European contact in a more complex and, ultimately, more satisfactory way.


The Lone Ranger Vol 6 Native Ground

Filename: the-lone-ranger-vol-6-native-ground.pdf
ISBN: 9781606904015
Release Date: 2013-09-04
Number of pages: 146
Author: Ande Parks
Publisher: Dynamite

Download and read online The Lone Ranger Vol 6 Native Ground in PDF and EPUB The Wild West is a harsh landscape. The terrain is unforgiving, the men hardened and desperate and the law hard to come by. Now, those who find themselves oppressed or victimized have new allies. Two brave men who have dedicated themselves to helping those in need… to justice. "Hard Country" tells the story of the early days of The Lone Ranger and Tonto on the open trail. As the two heroes roam the West, they encounter a murderous gang, a legendary gunfighter at the end of his bloody career, a megalomaniacal Sheriff and the suffering each leaves in their path. The Lone Ranger and Tonto have hit the trails of the Wild West. Now, the West hits back. In a story that draws on the actual history of the period, two good men will do all they can to make a difference… in a hard country.


The Middle Ground

Filename: the-middle-ground.pdf
ISBN: 9781139495684
Release Date: 2010-11-01
Number of pages:
Author: Richard White
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online The Middle Ground in PDF and EPUB An acclaimed book and widely acknowledged classic, The Middle Ground steps outside the simple stories of Indian-white relations - stories of conquest and assimilation and stories of cultural persistence. It is, instead, about a search for accommodation and common meaning. It tells how Europeans and Indians met, regarding each other as alien, as other, as virtually nonhuman, and how between 1650 and 1815 they constructed a common, mutually comprehensible world in the region around the Great Lakes that the French called pays d'en haut. Here the older worlds of the Algonquians and of various Europeans overlapped, and their mixture created new systems of meaning and of exchange. Finally, the book tells of the breakdown of accommodation and common meanings and the re-creation of the Indians as alien and exotic. First published in 1991, the 20th anniversary edition includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of this study.


The Return of the Native

Filename: the-return-of-the-native.pdf
ISBN: UOM:39015001136939
Release Date: 1922
Number of pages: 483
Author: Thomas Hardy
Publisher:

Download and read online The Return of the Native in PDF and EPUB


Facing East from Indian Country

Filename: facing-east-from-indian-country.pdf
ISBN: 0674042727
Release Date: 2009-06-01
Number of pages: 336
Author: Dr Daniel K Richter
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online Facing East from Indian Country in PDF and EPUB In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers. Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In "Facing East from Indian Country," Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States. Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating. In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.


Navajo Talking Picture

Filename: navajo-talking-picture.pdf
ISBN: 9780803240827
Release Date: 2012-07-01
Number of pages: 272
Author: Randolph Lewis
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

Download and read online Navajo Talking Picture in PDF and EPUB Navajo Talking Picture, released in 1985, is one of the earliest and most controversial works of Native cinema. It is a documentary by Los Angeles filmmaker Arlene Bowman, who travels to the Navajo reservation to record the traditional ways of her grandmother in order to understand her own cultural heritage. For reasons that have often confused viewers, the filmmaker persists despite her traditional grandmother’s forceful objections to the apparent invasion of her privacy. What emerges is a strange and thought-provoking work that abruptly calls into question the issue of insider versus outsider and other assumptions that have obscured the complexities of Native art. Randolph Lewis offers an insightful introduction and analysis of Navajo Talking Picture, in which he shows that it is not simply the first Navajo-produced film but also a path-breaking work in the history of indigenous media in the United States. Placing the film in a number of revealing contexts, including the long history of Navajo people working in Hollywood, the ethics of documentary filmmaking, and the often problematic reception of Native art, Lewis explores the tensions and mysteries hidden in this unsettling but fascinating film.


The Return of the Native

Filename: the-return-of-the-native.pdf
ISBN: 9788892557024
Release Date: 2016-02-22
Number of pages:
Author: Thomas Hardy
Publisher: Thomas Hardy

Download and read online The Return of the Native in PDF and EPUB The date at which the following events are assumed to have occurred may be set down as between 1840 and 1850, when the old watering place herein called "Budmouth" still retained sufficient afterglow from its Georgian gaiety and prestige to lend it an absorbing attractiveness to the romantic and imaginative soul of a lonely dweller inland. Under the general name of "Egdon Heath," which has been given to the sombre scene of the story, are united or typified heaths of various real names, to the number of at least a dozen; these being virtually one in character and aspect, though their original unity, or partial unity, is now somewhat disguised by intrusive strips and slices brought under the plough with varying degrees of success, or planted to woodland. It is pleasant to dream that some spot in the extensive tract whose southwestern quarter is here described, may be the heath of that traditionary King of Wessex—Lear. "To sorrow I bade good morrow, And thought to leave her far away behind; But cheerly, cheerly, She loves me dearly; She is so constant to me, and so kind. I would deceive her, And so leave her, But ah! she is so constant and so kind."


Covering Ground

Filename: covering-ground.pdf
ISBN: 9781580176651
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 224
Author: Barbara W. Ellis
Publisher: Storey Publishing

Download and read online Covering Ground in PDF and EPUB The author of Shady Retreats offers a fresh approach to using a variety of beautiful ground covers throughout the home landscape, explaining how to incorporate flowering plants, herbs, mosses, ground-hugging shrubs, heathers, and other species into a low-maintenance, creative yard and including how-to guidelines on site preparation, plant selection, weed control, and more. Simultaneous.


On Our Own Ground

Filename: on-our-own-ground.pdf
ISBN: 0870237705
Release Date: 1992
Number of pages: 344
Author: William Apess
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

Download and read online On Our Own Ground in PDF and EPUB Makes available in a superb scholarly edition not only the first published autobiography by a native American (1829 originally), but also a range of historical, political, and personal writings. -- New York Times Book Review


Uneven Ground

Filename: uneven-ground.pdf
ISBN: 0806133953
Release Date: 2002-08-01
Number of pages: 326
Author: David Eugene Wilkins
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

Download and read online Uneven Ground in PDF and EPUB In the early 1970s, the federal government began recognizing self-determination for American Indian nations. As sovereign entities, Indian nations have been able to establish policies concerning health care, education, religious freedom, law enforcement, gaming, and taxation. David E. Wilkins and K. Tsianina Lomawaima discuss how the political rights and sovereign status of Indian nations have variously been respected, ignored, terminated, and unilaterally modified by federal lawmakers as a result of the ambivalent political and legal status of tribes under western law.


The Victory with No Name

Filename: the-victory-with-no-name.pdf
ISBN: 9780199388004
Release Date: 2014-09-04
Number of pages: 224
Author: Colin G. Calloway
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online The Victory with No Name in PDF and EPUB In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Maumee River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in killed and wounded, while Indian casualties numbered only a few dozen. But despite the lopsided result, it wouldn't appear to carry much significance; it involved only a few thousand people, lasted less than three hours, and the outcome, which was never in doubt, was permanently reversed a mere three years later. Neither an epic struggle nor a clash that changed the course of history, the battle doesn't even have a name. Yet, as renowned Native American historian Colin Calloway demonstrates here, St. Clair's Defeat--as it came to be known-- was hugely important for its time. It was both the biggest victory the Native Americans ever won, and, proportionately, the biggest military disaster the United States had suffered. With the British in Canada waiting in the wings for the American experiment in republicanism to fail, and some regions of the West gravitating toward alliance with Spain, the defeat threatened the very existence of the infant United States. Generating a deluge of reports, correspondence, opinions, and debates in the press, it produced the first congressional investigation in American history, while ultimately changing not only the manner in which Americans viewed, raised, organized, and paid for their armies, but the very ways in which they fought their wars. Emphasizing the extent to which the battle has been overlooked in history, Calloway illustrates how this moment of great victory by American Indians became an aberration in the national story and a blank spot in the national memory. Calloway shows that St. Clair's army proved no match for the highly motivated and well-led Native American force that shattered not only the American army but the ill-founded assumption that Indians stood no chance against European methods and models of warfare. An engaging and enlightening read for American history enthusiasts and scholars alike, The Victory with No Name brings this significant moment in American history back to light.


The Native American Identity in Sports

Filename: the-native-american-identity-in-sports.pdf
ISBN: 9780810887084
Release Date: 2013
Number of pages: 213
Author: Frank A. Salamone
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Download and read online The Native American Identity in Sports in PDF and EPUB This collection of essays examines how sport has contributed to shaping and expressing Native American identity—from the attempt of the old Indian Schools to “Americanize” Native Americans through sport to the “Indian mascot” controversy and what it says about the broader public view of Native Americans. Additional essays explore the contemporary use of the traditional sport Toka to combat obesity in some Native American communities, the Seminoles' commercialization of alligator wrestling—a “Native” sport that was, in fact, only developed as a sport due to interest from tourists—and much more. The contributions to this volume not only tell the story of Native Americans' participation in the world of sports, but also how Native Americans have changed and enriched the sports world in the process.


An Infinity of Nations

Filename: an-infinity-of-nations.pdf
ISBN: 081224365X
Release Date: 2012-01-06
Number of pages: 456
Author: Michael Witgen
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

Download and read online An Infinity of Nations in PDF and EPUB An Infinity of Nations explores the formation and development of a Native New World in North America. Until the middle of the nineteenth century, indigenous peoples controlled the vast majority of the continent while European colonies of the Atlantic World were largely confined to the eastern seaboard. To be sure, Native North America experienced far-reaching and radical change following contact with the peoples, things, and ideas that flowed inland following the creation of European colonies on North American soil. Most of the continent's indigenous peoples, however, were not conquered, assimilated, or even socially incorporated into the settlements and political regimes of this Atlantic New World. Instead, Native peoples forged a New World of their own. This history, the evolution of a distinctly Native New World, is a foundational story that remains largely untold in histories of early America. Through imaginative use of both Native language and European documents, historian Michael Witgen recreates the world of the indigenous peoples who ruled the western interior of North America. The Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples of the Great Lakes and Northern Great Plains dominated the politics and political economy of these interconnected regions, which were pivotal to the fur trade and the emergent world economy. Moving between cycles of alliance and competition, and between peace and violence, the Anishinaabeg and Dakota carved out a place for Native peoples in modern North America, ensuring not only that they would survive as independent and distinct Native peoples but also that they would be a part of the new community of nations who made the New World.