New England Bound Slavery and Colonization in Early America

Filename: new-england-bound-slavery-and-colonization-in-early-america.pdf
ISBN: 9781631492150
Release Date: 2016-06-07
Number of pages: 352
Author: Wendy Warren
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online New England Bound Slavery and Colonization in Early America in PDF and EPUB Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize A New York Times Notable Book of 2016 A New York Times Editor’s Choice "This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." —David W. Blight In a work that fundamentally recasts the history of colonial America, Wendy Warren shows how the institution of slavery was inexorably linked with the first century of English colonization of New England. While most histories of slavery in early America confine themselves to the Southern colonies and the Caribbean, New England Bound forcefully widens the historical aperture to include the entirety of English North America, integrating the famed "city on a hill" of seventeenth-century Puritan New England into the cruel Atlantic system from its very beginnings. Using original research culled from dozens of archives, Warren conclusively links the growth of the northern colonies to the Atlantic slave trade, showing how seventeenth-century New England’s fledgling economy derived its vitality from the profusion of ships that coursed through its ports, passing through on their way to and from the West Indian sugar colonies. What’s more, leading New England families like the Winthrops and Pynchons invested heavily in the West Indies, owning both land and human property, the profits of which eventually wended their way back north. That money, New England Bound shows, was the tragic fuel for the colonial wars of removal and replacement of New England Indians that characterized the initial colonization of the region. Warren painstakingly documents the little-known history of how Native Americans were systematically sold as slaves to plantations in the Caribbean, even in the first decades of English colonization. And even while New England Bound explains the way in which the Atlantic slave trade drove the colonization of New England, it also brings to light, in many cases for the first time ever, the lives of the thousands of reluctant Indian and African slaves who found themselves forced into the project of building that city on a hill. We encounter enslaved Africans working side jobs as con artists, enslaved Indians who protested their banishment to sugar islands, enslaved Africans who set fire to their owners’ homes and goods, and enslaved Africans who saved their owners’ lives. In Warren’s meticulous, compelling, and hard-won recovery of such forgotten lives, the true variety of chattel slavery in the Americas comes to light, and New England Bound becomes the new standard for understanding colonial America.


New England Bound

Filename: new-england-bound.pdf
ISBN: 1631493248
Release Date: 2017-05-09
Number of pages: 368
Author: Wendy Warren
Publisher:

Download and read online New England Bound in PDF and EPUB "This book is an original achievement, the kind of history that chastens our historical memory as it makes us wiser." David W. Blight "


New England Bound

Filename: new-england-bound.pdf
ISBN: 0871406721
Release Date: 2016-06-06
Number of pages: 352
Author: Wendy Warren
Publisher:

Download and read online New England Bound in PDF and EPUB In the tradition of Edmund S. Morgan, whose American Slavery, American Freedom revolutionized colonial history, a new generation of historians is fundamentally rewriting America's beginnings. Nowhere is this more evident than in Wendy Warren's explosive New England Bound, which reclaims the lives of so many long-forgotten enslaved Africans and Native Americans in the seventeenth century. Based on new evidence, Warren links the growth of the northern colonies to the Atlantic slave trade, demonstrating how New England's economy derived its vitality from the profusion of slave-trading ships coursing through its ports. Warren documents how Indians were systematically sold into slavery in the West Indies and reveals how colonial families like the Winthrops were motivated not only by religious freedom but also by their slave-trading investments. New England Bound punctures the myth of a shining "City on a Hill," forcefully demonstrating that the history of American slavery can no longer confine itself to the nineteenth-century South.


Brethren by Nature

Filename: brethren-by-nature.pdf
ISBN: 9780801456473
Release Date: 2015-06-16
Number of pages: 312
Author: Margaret Ellen Newell
Publisher: Cornell University Press

Download and read online Brethren by Nature in PDF and EPUB In Brethren by Nature, Margaret Ellen Newell reveals a little-known aspect of American history: English colonists in New England enslaved thousands of Indians. Massachusetts became the first English colony to legalize slavery in 1641, and the colonists' desire for slaves shaped the major New England Indian wars, including the Pequot War of 1637, King Philip's War of 1675–76, and the northeastern Wabanaki conflicts of 1676–1749. When the wartime conquest of Indians ceased, New Englanders turned to the courts to get control of their labor, or imported Indians from Florida and the Carolinas, or simply claimed free Indians as slaves. Drawing on letters, diaries, newspapers, and court records, Newell recovers the slaves’ own stories and shows how they influenced New England society in crucial ways. Indians lived in English homes, raised English children, and manned colonial armies, farms, and fleets, exposing their captors to Native religion, foods, and technology. Some achieved freedom and power in this new colonial culture, but others experienced violence, surveillance, and family separations. Newell also explains how slavery linked the fate of Africans and Indians. The trade in Indian captives connected New England to Caribbean and Atlantic slave economies. Indians labored on sugar plantations in Jamaica, tended fields in the Azores, and rowed English naval galleys in Tangier. Indian slaves outnumbered Africans within New England before 1700, but the balance soon shifted. Fearful of the growing African population, local governments stripped Indian and African servants and slaves of legal rights and personal freedoms. Nevertheless, because Indians remained a significant part of the slave population, the New England colonies did not adopt all of the rigid racial laws typical of slave societies in Virginia and Barbados. Newell finds that second- and third-generation Indian slaves fought their enslavement and claimed citizenship in cases that had implications for all enslaved peoples in eighteenth-century America.


Black Yankees

Filename: black-yankees.pdf
ISBN: 0870235877
Release Date: 1988-01-01
Number of pages: 237
Author: William Dillon Piersen
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

Download and read online Black Yankees in PDF and EPUB Describes the lives of Blacks in colonial New England, discusses the influence of African culture on their communities, and explains how they developed their own way of life.


Love of Freedom

Filename: love-of-freedom.pdf
ISBN: 019977983X
Release Date: 2010-02-01
Number of pages: 280
Author: Catherine Adams
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Love of Freedom in PDF and EPUB They baked New England's Thanksgiving pies, preached their faith to crowds of worshippers, spied for the patriots during the Revolution, wrote that human bondage was a sin, and demanded reparations for slavery. Black women in colonial and revolutionary New England sought not only legal emancipation from slavery but defined freedom more broadly to include spiritual, familial, and economic dimensions. Hidden behind the banner of achieving freedom was the assumption that freedom meant affirming black manhood The struggle for freedom in New England was different for men than for women. Black men in colonial and revolutionary New England were struggling for freedom from slavery and for the right to patriarchal control of their own families. Women had more complicated desires, seeking protection and support in a male headed household while also wanting personal liberty. Eventually women who were former slaves began to fight for dignity and respect for womanhood and access to schooling for black children.


Race and Redemption in Puritan New England

Filename: race-and-redemption-in-puritan-new-england.pdf
ISBN: 9780195366594
Release Date: 2011-05-26
Number of pages: 209
Author: Richard A. Bailey
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

Download and read online Race and Redemption in Puritan New England in PDF and EPUB While much has been written about race in early America, scholars have generally focused on the southern colonies in the 18th century. Here, Bailey turns his gaze northward and to an earlier period, to the origins of puritan New England, and contends that as colonial New Englanders offered spiritual redemption to their neighbors they began creating raced identities for their Native American and African neighbors.


The Slave s Cause

Filename: the-slave-s-cause.pdf
ISBN: 9780300182088
Release Date: 2016-02-23
Number of pages: 320
Author: Manisha Sinha
Publisher: Yale University Press

Download and read online The Slave s Cause in PDF and EPUB Received historical wisdom casts abolitionists as bourgeois, mostly white reformers burdened by racial paternalism and economic conservatism. Manisha Sinha overturns this image, broadening her scope beyond the antebellum period usually associated with abolitionism and recasting it as a radical social movement in which men and women, black and white, free and enslaved found common ground in causes ranging from feminism and utopian socialism to anti-imperialism and efforts to defend the rights of labor. Drawing on extensive archival research, including newly discovered letters and pamphlets, Sinha documents the influence of the Haitian Revolution and the centrality of slave resistance in shaping the ideology and tactics of abolition. This book is a comprehensive new history of the abolition movement in a transnational context. It illustrates how the abolitionist vision ultimately linked the slave’s cause to the struggle to redefine American democracy and human rights across the globe.


Disowning Slavery

Filename: disowning-slavery.pdf
ISBN: 0801484375
Release Date: 1998
Number of pages: 296
Author: Joanne Pope Melish
Publisher: Cornell University Press

Download and read online Disowning Slavery in PDF and EPUB Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawing on a wide array of primary sources—from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides—Joanne Pope Melish reveals not only how northern society changed but how its perceptions changed as well. Melish explores the origins of racial thinking and practices to show how ill-prepared the region was to accept a population of free people of color in its midst. Because emancipation was gradual, whites transferred prejudices shaped by slavery to their relations with free people of color, and their attitudes were buttressed by abolitionist rhetoric which seemed to promise riddance of slaves as much as slavery. Melish tells how whites came to blame the impoverished condition of people of color on their innate inferiority, how racialization became an important component of New England ante-bellum nationalism, and how former slaves actively participated in this discourse by emphasizing their African identity. Placing race at the center of New England history, she contends that slavery was important not only as a labor system but also as an institutionalized set of relations. The collective amnesia about local slavery's existence became a significant component of New England regional identity.


American Passage

Filename: american-passage.pdf
ISBN: 9780674745407
Release Date: 2015-01-05
Number of pages: 320
Author: Katherine Grandjean
Publisher: Harvard University Press

Download and read online American Passage in PDF and EPUB Katherine Grandjean shows that the English conquest of New England was not just a matter of consuming territory, of transforming woods into farms. It entailed a struggle to control the flow of information—who could travel where, what news could be sent, over which routes winding through the woods along the early American communications frontier.


Slavery in the Age of Reason

Filename: slavery-in-the-age-of-reason.pdf
ISBN: 9781572335653
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 284
Author: Alexandra A. Chan
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

Download and read online Slavery in the Age of Reason in PDF and EPUB "Using traditional archaeological techniques and analysis, as well as theoretical perspectives and representational styles of post-processualist schools of thought, Slavery in the Age of Reason is an innovative volume that portrays the Royall family and the people they enslaved "from the inside out." It should put to rest any lingering myth that the peculiar institution was any less harsh or complex when found in the North." From the bookjacket.


Slave Law in the Americas

Filename: slave-law-in-the-americas.pdf
ISBN: 0820311790
Release Date: 1989-01-01
Number of pages: 179
Author: Alan Watson
Publisher: University of Georgia Press

Download and read online Slave Law in the Americas in PDF and EPUB In this book, Alan Watson argues that the slave laws of North and South America--the written codes defining the relationship of masters to slaves--reflect not so much the culture and society of the various colonies but the legal traditions of England, Europe, and ancient Rome. A pathbreaking study concerned as much with the nature of comparative law as the specific subject of the law of slavery, Slave Law in the Americas posits an essential distance in the Western legal tradition between the tenets of law and the values of the society they govern. Laws, Watson shows, often are made not by governments or rulers but by jurists as in ancient Rome, law professors as in medieval and continental Europe, and judges as in common law England. Bodies of law, often created without reference to particular social and political ideals, are also often transferred whole cloth from one society to another. Tracing the effects of the reception of Roman law throughout Europe (excluding England) and the Americas, Watson reveals the enormous impact of this legal tradition on subsequent lawmakers operating under utterly dissimilar social and political conditions in the New World. Slave law in the colonies, Watson demonstrates, had much to do with the mother country's relations to Roman law. Spain, Portugal, France, and the United Dutch Provinces, all within the Roman legal tradition, imposed on their colonies slave laws that were private and nonracist in character, laws that interfered little in master-slave relations and provided for the relative ease of manumission and the grant of citizenship to freed slaves. England, however, did not ascribe to Roman law and colonists created rather than received slave law. Public and racist, slave law in the English colonies uniquely reflected local concerns, involving every citizen in the protection and perpetuation of slavery, strictly regulating education, manumission, and citizenship status. "Comparative legal history," Watson writes, "is in its infancy." Presenting the laws of slavery in ancient Rome and in the slaveholding colonies of America, Watson demonstrates how comparative law can elucidate the relationship of law, legal rules, and institutions to the society in which they operate. Investigating not the dynamics of slavery but of slave law, he reveals the working of a legal culture and its peculiar history.


Unfreedom

Filename: unfreedom.pdf
ISBN: 9781479816149
Release Date: 2016-04-26
Number of pages: 272
Author: Jared Ross Hardesty
Publisher: NYU Press

Download and read online Unfreedom in PDF and EPUB In Unfreedom, Jared Ross Hardesty examines the lived experience of slaves in eighteenth-century Boston. Instead of relying on the traditional dichotomy of slavery and freedom, Hardesty argues we should understand slavery in Boston as part of a continuum of unfreedom. In this context, African slavery existed alongside many other forms of oppression, including Native American slavery, indentured servitude, apprenticeship, and pauper apprenticeship. In this hierarchical and inherently unfree world, enslaved Bostonians were more concerned with their everyday treatment and honor than with emancipation, as they pushed for autonomy, protected their families and communities, and demanded a place in society. Drawing on exhaustive research in colonial legal records – including wills, court documents, and minutes of governmental bodies – as well as newspapers, church records, and other contemporaneous sources, Hardesty masterfully reconstructs an eighteenth-century Atlantic world of unfreedom that stretched from Europe to Africa to America. By reassessing the lives of enslaved Bostonians as part of a social order structured by ties of dependence, Hardesty not only demonstrates how African slaves were able to decode their new homeland and shape the terms of their enslavement, but also tells the story of how marginalized peoples engrained themselves in the very fabric of colonial American society.


Selling Empire

Filename: selling-empire.pdf
ISBN: 9781469622316
Release Date: 2016-02-02
Number of pages: 472
Author: Jonathan Eacott
Publisher: UNC Press Books

Download and read online Selling Empire in PDF and EPUB Linking four continents over three centuries, Selling Empire demonstrates the centrality of India--both as an idea and a place--to the making of a global British imperial system. In the seventeenth century, Britain was economically, politically, and militarily weaker than India, but Britons increasingly made use of India's strengths to build their own empire in both America and Asia. Early English colonial promoters first envisioned America as a potential India, hoping that the nascent Atlantic colonies could produce Asian raw materials. When this vision failed to materialize, Britain's circulation of Indian manufactured goods--from umbrellas to cottons--to Africa, Europe, and America then established an empire of goods and the supposed good of empire. Eacott recasts the British empire's chronology and geography by situating the development of consumer culture, the American Revolution, and British industrialization in the commercial intersections linking the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. From the seventeenth into the nineteenth century and beyond, the evolving networks, ideas, and fashions that bound India, Britain, and America shaped persisting global structures of economic and cultural interdependence.


Freedom Bound

Filename: freedom-bound.pdf
ISBN: 1139490931
Release Date: 2010-08-31
Number of pages:
Author: Christopher Tomlins
Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Download and read online Freedom Bound in PDF and EPUB Freedom Bound is about the origins of modern America - a history of colonizing, work and civic identity from the beginnings of English presence on the mainland until the Civil War. It is a history of migrants and migrations, of colonizers and colonized, of households and servitude and slavery, and of the freedom all craved and some found. Above all it is a history of the law that framed the entire process. Freedom Bound tells how colonies were planted in occupied territories, how they were populated with migrants - free and unfree - to do the work of colonizing and how the newcomers secured possession. It tells of the new civic lives that seemed possible in new commonwealths and of the constraints that kept many from enjoying them. It follows the story long past the end of the eighteenth century until the American Civil War, when - just for a moment - it seemed that freedom might finally be unbound.