For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too

Filename: for-white-folks-who-teach-in-the-hood-and-the-rest-of-y-all-too.pdf
ISBN: 9780807028025
Release Date: 2017-01-03
Number of pages: 232
Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher: Beacon Press

Download and read online For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too in PDF and EPUB A New York Times Best Seller Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better. He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student's culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike--both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally. Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the "Seven C's" of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too has been featured in MotherJones.com, Education Week, Weekend All Things Considered with Michel Martin, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, PBS NewsHour.com, Slate, The Washington Post, Scholastic Administrator Magazine, Essence Magazine, Salon, ColorLines, Ebony.com, Huffington Post Education


For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too

Filename: for-white-folks-who-teach-in-the-hood-and-the-rest-of-y-all-too.pdf
ISBN: 9780807006412
Release Date: 2016-03-22
Number of pages: 232
Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher: Beacon Press

Download and read online For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too in PDF and EPUB A New York Times Best Seller Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y’all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better. He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student’s culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike—both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally. Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the “Seven C’s” of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too has been featured in MotherJones.com, Education Week, Weekend All Things Considered with Michel Martin, Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, PBS NewsHour.com, Slate, The Washington Post, Scholastic Administrator Magazine, Essence Magazine, Salon, ColorLines, Ebony.com, Huffington Post Education


For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too

Filename: for-white-folks-who-teach-in-the-hood-and-the-rest-of-y-all-too.pdf
ISBN: 9780807006405
Release Date: 2016-03-22
Number of pages: 232
Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher: Beacon Press

Download and read online For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y all Too in PDF and EPUB Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in classrooms as a young man of color and merging his experiences with more than a decade of teaching and researching in urban America, award-winning educator Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on an approach to teaching and learning in urban schools. He begins by taking to task the perception of urban youth of color as unteachable, and he challenges educators to embrace and respect each student's culture and to reimagine the classroom as a site where roles are reversed and students become the experts in their own learning. Putting forth his theory of Reality Pedagogy, Emdin provides practical tools to unleash the brilliance and eagerness of youth and educators alike--both of whom have been typecast and stymied by outdated modes of thinking about urban education. With this fresh and engaging new pedagogical vision, Emdin demonstrates the importance of creating a family structure and building communities within the classroom, using culturally relevant strategies like hip-hop music and call-and-response, and connecting the experiences of urban youth to indigenous populations globally. Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, Emdin demonstrates how by implementing the "Seven C's" of reality pedagogy in their own classrooms, urban youth of color benefit from truly transformative education. Lively, accessible, and revelatory, For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood...and the Rest of Y'all Too is the much-needed antidote to traditional top-down pedagogy and promises to radically reframe the landscape of urban education for the better.


Urban Science Education for the Hip hop Generation

Filename: urban-science-education-for-the-hip-hop-generation.pdf
ISBN: 9087909861
Release Date: 2010
Number of pages: 126
Author: Christopher Emdin
Publisher:

Download and read online Urban Science Education for the Hip hop Generation in PDF and EPUB Christopher Emdin is an assistant professor of science education and director of secondary school initiatives at the Urban Science Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a Ph.D. in urban education with a concentration in mathematics, science and technology; a master's degree in natural sciences; and a bachelor's degree in physical anthropology, biology, and chemistry. His book, Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation is rooted in his experiences as student, teacher, administrator, and researcher in urban schools and the deep relationship between hip-hop culture and science that he discovered at every stage of his academic and professional journey. The book utilizes autobiography, outcomes of research studies, theoretical explorations, and accounts of students' experiences in schools to shed light on the causes for the lack of educational achievement of urban youth from the hip-hop generation.


What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher

Filename: what-a-coach-can-teach-a-teacher.pdf
ISBN: 0820479055
Release Date: 2010
Number of pages: 260
Author: Jeffrey Michael Reyes Duncan-Andrade
Publisher: Peter Lang

Download and read online What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher in PDF and EPUB This book, written by an experienced urban classroom teacher and coach, aims to document effective practices in urban schools and to provide insight into productive program building and educational practices. The book rejects the up-by-your-bootstraps theory of success, offering in its place a set of concrete strategies for teachers and educational leaders who are committed to fundamentaiiy rethinking the business-as-usual approach which continues to fail urban school children. This book is well-suited for classes working with educational leaders, classroom teachers, sports coaches, and educational researchers. "An educator, a theorist, an activist, and a coach...Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade draws on all of these roles to explain what it takes to teach and motivate young people to succeed. Through this skillful analysis of the role of sports in the lives of urban youth, Duncan-Andrade reveals how educators can buiid relationships and develop a deeper sense of meaning about the purpose of education with the young people they serve. An inspiring, insightful analysis and an invaluable guide for those who recognize the potential for education to transform lives and empower urban youth." ---Pedro A, Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Development; Executive Director, Metropolitan Center for Urban Education, New York University "Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade always presents us with a freshness...fresh ideas, fresh analysis, fresh perspectives. It is no different in this volume. One of the freshest takes on coaching, teaching, and learning from a critical perspective." ---Gloria Ladson-Biltings, Professor and Chair, Department of Curriculum and Instruction; Keilner Family Chair in Urban Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison "This is a book for anyone who cares to chart a path for children and youth in urban schools. There is so much to recommend in this book, but above it ail is'the sense of optirnism that sports can be a tool for empowerment for all our kids, whether or not they have pro potential."---Dave Zirin, Author of A People's History of Sports' in the U.S.


Between the World and the Urban Classroom

Filename: between-the-world-and-the-urban-classroom.pdf
ISBN: 9789463510325
Release Date: 2017-05-12
Number of pages: 20
Author: George Sirrakos Jr.
Publisher: Springer

Download and read online Between the World and the Urban Classroom in PDF and EPUB Borrowing from the ideas of John Dewey, schools and classrooms are a reflection of the world; therefore, in order to make sense of the urban classroom, we need to make sense of the world. In this book, the editors have compiled a collection of nine critical essays, or chapters, each examining a particular contemporary national and/or international event. The essays each undertake an explicit approach to naming oppression and addressing it in the context of urban schooling. Each essay has a two-fold purpose. The first purpose is to help readers see the world unveiled, through a more critical lens, and to problematize long held beliefs about urban classrooms, with regard to race, gender, social class, equity, and access. Second, as each author draws parallels between an event and urban classrooms, a better understanding of the microstructures that exist in urban classrooms emerges. “At a time of serious political, economic, and social uncertainty, we need a book like this, one that showcases how the world can be seen as a critical site of curriculum and pedagogy. A powerful intersectional analysis of the world, word, and urban sociopolitical context, authors in this book push the boundaries of what educators know and do in urban schools and classrooms. Grounded in frameworks of critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy, authors center essential societal moments that must be viewed as the real curriculum. These moments can equip students with tools to examine ‘the what of the world’ as well as how to examine, critique, challenge, and disrupt individual, systemic, and structural realities and practices that perpetuate and maintain a racist, sexist, homophobic, and xenophobic status quo. This is an important, forward-thinking, innovative book – a welcome addition to the field of urban education.” – H. Richard Milner IV, Helen Faison Chair of Urban Education, University of Pittsburgh


Multiplication Is for White People

Filename: multiplication-is-for-white-people.pdf
ISBN: 9781595587701
Release Date: 2012-03-20
Number of pages: 256
Author: Lisa Delpit
Publisher: New Press, The

Download and read online Multiplication Is for White People in PDF and EPUB As MacArthur award-winning educator Lisa Delpit reminds us—and as all research shows—there is no achievement gap at birth. In her long-awaited second book, Delpit presents a striking picture of the elements of contemporary public education that conspire against the prospects for poor children of color, creating a persistent gap in achievement during the school years that has eluded several decades of reform. Delpit's bestselling and paradigm-shifting first book, Other People's Children, focused on cultural slippage in the classroom between white teachers and students of color. Now, in "Multiplication is for White People", Delpit reflects on two decades of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, the creation of alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have still left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement isn't for them. In chapters covering primary, middle, and high school, as well as college, Delpit concludes that it's not that difficult to explain the persistence of the achievement gap. In her wonderful trademark style, punctuated with telling classroom anecdotes and informed by time spent at dozens of schools across the country, Delpit outlines an inspiring and uplifting blueprint for raising expectations for other people's children, based on the simple premise that multiplication—and every aspect of advanced education—is for everyone.


Teaching While Black

Filename: teaching-while-black.pdf
ISBN: 9780823271405
Release Date: 2016-03-01
Number of pages: 232
Author: Pamela Lewis
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Teaching While Black in PDF and EPUB Teaching While Black is both a deeply personal narrative of a black woman's real-life experiences and a clarion call for culturally responsive teaching. Lewis fearlessly addresses the reality of toxic school culture head-on and gives readers an inside look at the inert bureaucracy, heavy-handed administrators, and ineffective approach to pedagogy that prevent inner-city kids from learning. At the heart of Lewis's moving narrative is her passion. Each chapter delves deeper into the author's conscious uncoupling from the current trends in public education that diminish proven remedies for academic underachievement, as observed from her own experiences as a teacher of students of color. -- Provided by publisher.


Urban Teaching

Filename: urban-teaching.pdf
ISBN: 9780807756898
Release Date: 2016-02-19
Number of pages: 112
Author: Lois Weiner
Publisher: Teachers College Press

Download and read online Urban Teaching in PDF and EPUB This significantly revised edition will help prospective and new city teachers navigate the realities of city teaching. Now the classic introduction to urban teaching, this book explains how global, national, state, and local reforms have impacted what teachers need to know to not only survive but to do their jobs well. The Third Edition melds new insights and perspectives from Daniel Jerome, New York City teacher, social justice activist, and parent of colour, with what Lois Weiner, a seasoned teacher educator has learned from research and decades of experience working with city teachers and students in a variety of settings. Together, the authors explore how successful teachers deal with the complexity, difficulty, and rewarding challenges of teaching in today's city schools.


Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty

Filename: reaching-and-teaching-students-in-poverty.pdf
ISBN: 9780807772218
Release Date: 2015-04-25
Number of pages: 217
Author: Paul C. Gorski
Publisher: Teachers College Press

Download and read online Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty in PDF and EPUB “This is the 'poverty book' I’ve been waiting for. It provides powerful, clear-eyed analysis of why economic inequities exist and persist, and practical classroom-tested guidance for teachers and leaders who care to make a difference. Paul Gorski’s voice is passionate, accessible, politically astute, and (I hope) impossible to ignore.” —Gary Howard, founder of the REACH Center and author of We Can't Teach What We Don't Know, Second Edition “This book should be required reading for all teachers! In his wonderfully readable, highly lucid analysis of poverty and social class, Paul Gorski gently but firmly redirects teachers away from damaging ways of seeing students and families who live in poverty, toward a vision of respect that champions equity and enables young people to bloom in the classroom.” —Christine Sleeter,professor emerita, California State University Monterey Bay and immediate past president of the National Association for Multicultural Education “Finally! A book that helps educators not only learn about the devastating impact of poverty on children’s lives, but also helps them think about what they can do—in the words of author Paul Gorski—right now as well as in the future to help improve the life chances of young people living in poverty. Highly readable and comprehensive, Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty will be a welcome addition to school, university, and community bookshelves.” —Sonia Nieto,professor emerita, University of Massachusetts, Amherst “From one of the smartest scholars on poverty and education comes this engaging, relatable, and thoroughly researched book that every educator and school leader should read. Paul Gorski makes vivid and compelling how and why poverty matters, where and when we've gone wrong with current reforms, and perhaps most important, what we can do in our schools and classrooms to ensure that every child receives the very best education that our nation has to offer. Read and share it today.” —Kevin Kumashiro, Dean, School of Education, University of San Francisco, author of Bad Teacher! How Blaming Teachers Distorts the Bigger Picture The author draws from decades of research to deconstruct popular myths, misconceptions, and educational practices that undercut the achievement of low-income students. He carefully describes the challenges that students in poverty face and the resiliencies they and their families draw upon. Most importantly, this book provides specific, evidence-based strategies for teaching youth by creating equitable, bias-free learning environments. Written in an appealing conversational tone, this resource will help teachers and school leaders to better reach and teach students in poverty. Book Features: A conceptual framework for creating equitable educational opportunities for low- and middle-income youth.Instructional strategies based on an analysis of more than 20 years of research on what works (and what doesn’t work).A depiction of teachers, not as the problem when it comes to the achievement gap, but as champions of students.Activities such as a Poverty and Class Awareness Quiz.


Transforming Teacher Education for Social Justice

Filename: transforming-teacher-education-for-social-justice.pdf
ISBN: 9780807774496
Release Date: 2016
Number of pages: 138
Author: Eva Zygmunt
Publisher: Teachers College Press

Download and read online Transforming Teacher Education for Social Justice in PDF and EPUB Transforming Teacher Education for Social Justice offers teacher educators a new way to think about the development of culturally responsive educators. The authors identify the core components needed to restructure and reorient programs of teacher education to adequately prepare new teachers for the racially, culturally, and linguistically diverse communities they will serve upon graduation. They propose a new model of teacher preparation that capitalizes on the strengths of programs evidencing important outcomes. Chapters address the notion of situated learning embedded in communities; the need for extensive clinical experience in authentic teaching situations; strategies for interweaving theory, content, pedagogy, and classroom practice; the importance of student engagement and motivation; and the implementation of critical service learning. Key policy implications of this model are also discussed within the current landscape of teacher education reform. Book Features: A specific approach for realizing the promise of culturally responsive teaching. A flexible model for a community-engaged teacher preparation. Compelling data on student learning outcomes based on university/school/community collaboration as evidence of eliminating the achievement gap. “The most striking piece of this book is the descriptions and stories of how the community serves as mentors to the university faculty and students. The authors take readers with them through the many authentic activities led by the community mentors. We are left both with the desire to spend time with these remarkable community members ourselves and the desire to develop similar community-based programs.” —Jana Noel, California State University, Sacramento “Mandatory reading for teacher educators who are serious about preparing teachers for diverse schools and communities.” —Tyrone Howard, UCLA


Classroom Management

Filename: classroom-management.pdf
ISBN: 9781610487641
Release Date: 2012-02-15
Number of pages: 100
Author: Sean B. Yisrael
Publisher: R&L Education

Download and read online Classroom Management in PDF and EPUB Many teachers who work in urban schools find classroom management to be very problematic. Their university course work, and training, didn’t prepare them for the heavy demands of being an urban school teacher. Urban educators need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to effectively manage adverse behaviors, and still deliver a quality education to all students. Classroom Management: A Guide for Urban School Teachers is designed to give educators practical strategies that will help them deal with the unique challenges faced by urban school teachers today. Whether the teacher is a novice teaching professional, or an experienced veteran; he/she will be able to learn how to establish and maintain control over the classroom environment, effectively deal with the most extreme student misbehaviors, establish rapport with students and parents, and reduce the amount of students sent to the principal’s office on referrals. After reading this book, teachers will be able to combat the negative forces that adversely affect the classroom setting, and be able to concentrate on teaching and learning.


The Teacher Wars

Filename: the-teacher-wars.pdf
ISBN: 9780385536967
Release Date: 2014-09-02
Number of pages: 352
Author: Dana Goldstein
Publisher: Anchor

Download and read online The Teacher Wars in PDF and EPUB In her groundbreaking history of 175 years of American education, Dana Goldstein finds answers in the past to the controversies that plague our public schools today. Teaching is a wildly contentious profession in America, one attacked and admired in equal measure. In The Teacher Wars, a rich, lively, and unprecedented history of public school teaching, Dana Goldstein reveals that teachers have been similarly embattled for nearly two centuries. From the genteel founding of the common schools movement in the nineteenth century to the violent inner-city teacher strikes of the 1960s and '70s, from the dispatching of Northeastern women to frontier schoolhouses to the founding of Teach for America on the Princeton University campus in 1989, Goldstein shows that the same issues have continued to bedevil us: Who should teach? What should be taught? Who should be held accountable for how our children learn? She uncovers the surprising roots of hot button issues, from teacher tenure to charter schools, and finds that recent popular ideas to improve schools—instituting merit pay, evaluating teachers by student test scores, ranking and firing veteran teachers, and recruiting “elite” graduates to teach—are all approaches that have been tried in the past without producing widespread change. And she also discovers an emerging effort that stands a real chance of transforming our schools for the better: drawing on the best practices of the three million public school teachers we already have in order to improve learning throughout our nation’s classrooms. The Teacher Wars upends the conversation about American education by bringing the lessons of history to bear on the dilemmas we confront today. By asking “How did we get here?” Dana Goldstein brilliantly illuminates the path forward.


This Is Not A Test

Filename: this-is-not-a-test.pdf
ISBN: 9781608464289
Release Date: 2014-05-05
Number of pages: 220
Author: José Vilson
Publisher: Haymarket Books

Download and read online This Is Not A Test in PDF and EPUB José Vilson writes about race, class, and education through stories from the classroom and researched essays. His rise from rookie math teacher to prominent teacher leader takes a twist when he takes on education reform through his now-blocked eponymous blog, TheJoseVilson.com. He calls for the reclaiming of the education profession while seeking social justice. José Vilson is a middle school math educator for in the Inwood/Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. He writes for Edutopia, GOOD, and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and his work has appeared in Education Week, CNN.com, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa.


Growing Critically Conscious Teachers

Filename: growing-critically-conscious-teachers.pdf
ISBN: 9780807756836
Release Date: 2016-03
Number of pages: 208
Author: Angela Valenzuela
Publisher: Teachers College Press

Download and read online Growing Critically Conscious Teachers in PDF and EPUB To meet the needs of the fast growing numbers of Latino/a English learners, this volume presents an approach to secondary education teacher preparation based on the work of the National Latino/a Education Research and Policy Project (NLERAP). Renowned scholar and educator Angela Valenzuela, together with an impressive roster of contributors, provides a critical framework for educating culturally responsive teachers. They examine the knowledge, skills, and predisposition required for higher education institutions to create curricula for educating Latino/a children, children of colour, and language minority youth. Growing Critically Conscious Teachers illuminates why growing our own teachers makes sense as an approach for not only addressing the achievement gap, but for also enhancing the well-being of our communities as a whole.